“Second beginning” for St Josephs, but funding commitments must follow – Fr. Duffy

first_img Previous articleDerry man admits sexually assaulting nurse in Altnagelvin HospitalNext articleJohn Kavanagh joins Harps to end of season News Highland Facebook By News Highland – July 27, 2018 Derry draw with Pats: Higgins & Thomson Reaction Google+ Twitter Pinterest Facebook Pinterest FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 Twitter DL Debate – 24/05/21 center_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp AudioHomepage BannerNews WhatsApp The future of St Joseph’s Hospital in Stranorlar will be the focus of a meeting to take place in September involving local campaigners, the Health Minister and senior department personnel, local oireachtas members and HSE officials.It follows confirmation in the Dail earlier this week that the HSE is seeking to retain long term facilities at St Joseph’s and the Ramelton Communoty Nursing Unit, while developing a new facility in Lifford.Campaigner Fr John Joe Duffy says there are still no concrete plans or funding commitments, but on today’s Nine til Noon Show, he described this as a second beginning……….Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/JJtraw.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Harps come back to win in Waterford Journey home will be easier – Paul Hegarty “Second beginning” for St Josephs, but funding commitments must follow – Fr. Duffy News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Google+last_img read more

Quick Hits: May 2018

first_imgNorth: Finding My Way While Running the Appalachian Trailby Scott JurekScott Jurek is one of the world’s most accomplished ultrarunners (fueled entirely by a vegan diet), and in 2015, he attempted to set the speed record for the Appalachian Trail. Just a week into his run, he sustained a quadriceps muscle tear that nearly shattered his record-setting dreams. But never bet against the champ. Jurek finds a way to push through injury in one of the most demanding and transcendent efforts of his life.Pipeline tree-felling begins in Nelson CountyAtlantic Coast Pipeline construction began in Nelson County last month near Wintergreen Resort, where crews began clearcutting along the 600-mile route. The pipeline also received permission to begin cutting trees along the pipeline route through national forest lands in West Virginia and Virginia.Moonlight MadnessDon’t feel like waking up for another early-morning road race? Toe the starting line of the Moonlight Madness 10K and run trails by the light of the moon. Race begins at 9 p.m. on May 26 at Camp Arrowhead in Ona, W.Va.Nooga’s 11-year-old Climbing ChampA Chattanoogan cemented his claim as one of the nation’s best young climbers in February by winning his class in USA Climbing’s 2018 Bouldering Youth National Championship. Hugo Hoyer, then 10, was one of six members of the High Point Chattanooga team to qualify for the national tournament. He’d finished third in the same competition in 2017 and third at USA Climbing’s Sport & Speed Youth National Championships in 2016 in Kennesaw, Georgia.Hoyer’s parents, both climbers, have encouraged him to climb since his playground days. A couple of years ago, they scouted climbing cities around the country before eventually relocating from Hoyer’s childhood home in Queens, New York, to Chattanooga.New A.T. Hall of FameA new class of Appalachian Trail Hall of Fame inductees will be honored this month at a ceremony in Pennsylvania. The eighth class of A.T. hall of famers includes the late photographer George Masa, a Japanese immigrant who lived in Asheville, N.C., in the early twentieth century. Masa’s influential images of the mountains and ardent conservation efforts are credited with helping with the foundation of Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Another regional inductee—Bob Peoples—is the owner of the Kincora Hostel, just off the trail in Hampton, Tenn. In addition to his hiker hospitality, Peoples is also known for his tireless trail maintenance efforts. Along with Masa and Peoples, two more inductees, William Kemsley and Liz Levers will be inducted during the annual Appalachian Trail Hall of Fame Banquet at the Allenberry Resort in Boiling Springs on May 4.Runners Find Puppies on Barkley Marathons CourseBack in March, two runners training on the course of the infamous Barkley Marathons, a grueling 100-mile slog in the backcountry of Tennessee’s remote Frozen Head State Park, found an abandoned litter of black lab puppies. According to Runner’s World, Ashley Blake and Joshua Scott were running on a trail when they heard noise in the nearby woods and surprisingly discovered five puppies huddled together trying to stay warm in near-freezing temperatures. After contacting a ranger station, the runners carried the puppies to safety, and the litter was eventually brought to Oak Ridge Animal Shelter. With the pups on his mind, Scott went to the shelter soon after the rescue and decided to adopt one of them. He named him Barkley.Fastest Race in AshevilleFor the past decade, some of the best runners in Asheville have gathered each week for a fast, flat training run along the French Broad River that finishes at the Wedge, an iconic brewery in the River Arts District. This legendary training run has grown into a 10K race on May 5—and it’s not just for fast folks. It’s a kid- and family-friendly event, and all youth runners under 17 get a 40% discount. The race benefits Girls on the Run WNC. Learn more at:ashevillerunningcollective.comRock Stars in VirginiaThe first-ever RockStar VA challenged mountain bikers to tackle 270 miles of dirt or gravel from Harrisonburg (ROCKtown) to Roanoke (STAR City). The multi-day bikepacking event began April 7 and included snow, rain, and sub-freezing temperatures on the first day. Of the 35 registered riders, only 9 finished (one rider was still on the course as of press date). Barry Croker won the trail route in 3 days, 19 hours, and 27 minutes. Croker has been racing mountain bikes since the early 90s and was the first to ride the Massunutten Ring solo. The 40-year-old rider is an active duty Air Force engineer with six children. David Landis took the gravel title in 1 day, 17 hours, and 45 minutes, and Jonathan Hicks and Dustin Welch completed the gravel ride on singlespeeds.last_img read more

Mark Heisler on the NBA: The Too Long Goodbye: Kobe goes out as only he can

first_imgIf you’re wondering what point there is in Kobe Bryant going on from here …That’s a really good question.I know the answer: He’s Kobe.This isn’t just a game, it has been his life in a way that it may not ever have been for any other player. Actually, with his legacy safe and the direction of the season set, there’s nothing important at stake, crazed as it is making everyone.“Yeah, I’ve seen him play and it’s disgusting,” an opposing player told the Los Angeles Times, quoting sources anonymously as if tracking the Watergate burglars back to Richard Nixon.In real life, for every Bill Russell who goes out on top, 100 Michael Jordans, Kareem Abdul-Jabbars, Magic Johnsons, Larry Birds, Wilt Chamberlains and Jerry Wests leave as imitations of themselves and are revered nonetheless.Kobe carved his legacy in stone years back: Not as great as MJ or as controversial as Wilt, but close.It’s a long season. Lakers fans, denuded of hope, need something to care about. Before, it was getting rid of Mike D’Antoni, the outsider.Soon, it’ll be getting rid of Byron Scott, who’s Lakers family.Unfortunately for the Lakers, Kobe, Byron and Jim Buss can join hands and walk out without helping.Does someone think Gregg Popovich takes this team to the playoffs?I know someone who doesn’t: Pop.There’s an important question and it’s not how long Kobe, Bryon and Jimbo stay:Will they tank to keep their No. 1 pick, which goes to Philadelphia unless it’s No. 1, 2 or 3?Actually, the real question is whether the Lakers are decisive enough to grasp that sad necessity.All they have in the meantime are the emerging futures of D’Angelo Russell, Julius Randle and Jordan Clarkson, none of whom is the Next Kobe; their desperate hope of landing a big free agent and Bryant’s dead duck of a swan song.Now totally legacy-conscious, Bryant has been totally gracious, tortured as his explanations have become.The best was last week in Oakland after his marathon pre-game warmup, hoping to shock the world in the nationally televised game against the Warriors.Instead, the world got more of the same. The Lakes lost by 38. Kobe shot 1 for 14, dropping him to 31.1 percent, last in the NBA, as is his 19.5 percent on 3-pointers while taking seven, count ‘em, seven a game.Afterward, he said he got upset with how things were going, which “bothered me so I got out of my Zen.”He ran out of Zen a while back — April 12, 2013, when he tore his Achilles, ending a brilliant run (he averaged 30.5 with 7.0 rebounds and 7.5 assists that month) and the notion of he and Dwight Howard restoring the Lakers.Bryant hasn’t had his legs since. His shots are almost uniformly contested, flat and short.If it’s unseemly, he earned the right to go out this way. If he’s in denial, he earned that, too.No player may have been as devoted to the game. No one ever worked as hard at it.“It’s a game that he’s loved since he was able to talk,” said ESPN’s Bruce Bowen, his old San Antonio rival, “so who are we to say this player shouldn’t do this thing?“If that’s where his heart is, I think you have to respect that.”It’s true. Kobe once told me he realized he had a destiny to fulfill — when he was six.When he became a Laker at 17, weighing 165 pounds, he hired away Joe Carbone, the 76ers’ strength and conditioning coach whom he had worked with, and moved him across country as his personal trainer.At 29, Bryant’s work ethic awed young teammates on the 2007 U.S. national team like LeBron James, who didn’t know him — Kobe had been anything but chatty — and were leery of him until finding he was human, if forbidding.Several games into a qualifying tournament in Las Vegas, Coach Mike Krzyzewski gave his players a day off. They headed for golf courses, tables and high-end stores, except Kobe, who went back to the Thomas and Mack Center to work out.You don’t just switch off his kind of devotion and determination.This may be all he has left but it’s safe, too: Kobe is going out Kobe.Mark Heisler has written an NBA column since 1991 and was honored with the Naismith Hall of Fame’s Curt Gowdy Award in 2006. His column is published Sundays in Los Angeles News Group print editions.center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more