Former friends charged with assaulting each other

first_imgThirty-eight-year-old security guard Melissa Azore and 54-year-old poultry farmer Linden Lewis, both residents of La Retraite, West Bank Demerara, appeared on Thursday before Wales Magistrate Rushell Liverpool, charged with assault committed on each other at La Retraite on February 10, 2018.Azore denied that she had assaulted Lewis, and Lewis likewise denied that he had assaulted Azore, causing her actual bodily harm.The court heard that the parties had been friends at one point, and Magistrate Liverpool ordered that neither party must interfere with the other while the matter is before the court.Azore was released on $5,000 bail, while Lewis was released on $25,000 bail. Their next court date is May 24, 2018.last_img

Congress White House Look to Fight over Defense Policy Bill

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR The House and Senate got a relatively early start on negotiations over a conference agreement for the fiscal 2017 defense authorization bill, but enactment of the measure is not certain as the Obama administration has issued a veto threat due to its opposition to a variety of policy provisions in the two versions.The administration’s sticking points include language in the Senate version reorganizing the Pentagon, including a provision which would eliminate the undersecretary of defense for acquisition, technology and logistics, and assign its duties to multiple officials, including an undersecretary for management support. DOD objects to other changes to its acquisition policies as well.The White House criticized the House version over its reliance on $18 billion in overseas contingency operations account (OCO) funds for base budget items — including more weapons and equipment, and higher end strength levels — not requested by the DOD. Using the funds allocated to the OCO account — which is not subject to the statutory budget caps — in an effort to restore shortfalls in military readiness would result in funding for overseas operations to run out at the end of April.“There’s a code term in there, ‘strongly object,’ which is normally interpreted as a veto threat, and there were more than 18 of those in this year’s statement of administration policy,” said Andrew Hunter, a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.Committee leaders began formal conference talks in July, with staff working out many of the lower-profile issues since then in an effort to agree on a compromise version when lawmakers return in September. With Congress back in session, the pace of negotiations should pick up.Lawmakers say they are hopeful they can reach agreement on a final bill before November, but analysts believe another late-year vote is more likely, reported Defense News.“It’s unlikely to make much progress in September,” said Justin Johnson of the Heritage Foundation.last_img read more