EGBA: German Policy unfit to tackle black market threats

first_img StumbleUpon Submit Related Articles Share Share EGBA calls for enhanced collaboration on consumer rights August 11, 2020 Jdigital appeals Spanish decree orders to EC courts July 23, 2020 EGBA – Black market looms on Spain if government proceeds with its advertising blackout July 14, 2020 The European Gaming and Betting Association (EGBA) has called upon German policymakers to ‘simplify the country’s complicated policy framework for online gambling’.The Brussels based industry trade body criticised Germany for being ‘one of the very few remaining European countries which has no properly functioning online gambling market’.Explaining why the new State Treaty must simplify current legislation, Maarten Haijer, Secretary General for the EGBA, said: “That is why EGBA fully supports the government’s efforts to establish a new gambling policy and we welcome progress towards developing a functional and effective online gambling regulation. However, with less than 50% of the country’s online gambling activity currently taking place on offshore websites, re-regulation will not be an easy task.”Haijer states that the State Treaty must tackle the rate of channelisation to unlicensed sites, especially when compared to both the UK and Denmark. However, he pointed out that the introduction of legislation which fails to be ‘evidence-led’ will set the scene for ‘continued political and legal challenges’.He added: “The starting position of Germany is so bad that, in 2017, the Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE) predicted that the country had a “channelling” rate of only 1.8% (e.g. 1.8% of online gambling activity in Germany took place on websites which are licensed in Germany), compared to 95% in UK and 90% in Denmark.“At least this makes the priority for the new policy clear: channelling. The new policy can only be effective if it ensures that gambling websites licensed in Germany are more attractive than those outside it – so customers will play on these websites rather than unlicensed ones. This requires the new policy to meet the customer’s needs by ensuring there is sufficient choice in the market – including brands, products and bet offerings.“That is why the policy measures currently on the table are highly questionable. They are overly prescriptive and introduce restrictions which are not evidence-led. The combined effects of the proposed restrictions on player accounts (e.g. deposit and time restrictions), on products (e.g. the ban on online casino is not fully lifted) and on bet types (e.g. live betting will be banned), jeopardises the task of achieving a high channelling rate and sets the scene for continued political and legal challenges.“We have had proper regulation of online gambling in Europe for well over 10 years now and it is time Germany got its house in order as well. It is in everyone’s interest to introduce a law which ensures high channelling rates, long term regulatory stability and a fully functioning market.”last_img read more

The Tico Times and MeToo in Costa Rica

first_imgRelated posts:We’re back! Coming in December: a special Tico Times Print Edition Óscar Arias, Costa Rica’s former president and a Nobel Prize winner, accused of sexual assault, per reports The Tico Times is now available on Apple News Support the Tico TimesFeisty. Dedicated to a cause. A little paper trying to do the best we can for the community and the country. That’s how another reporter described The Tico Times back in 1979, and every word of that still rings true today.Never in the Tico Times’ 62 year history have its journalists worked harder than we have this month to bring you transparent, ethical and honest reporting on the biggest stories in Costa Rica.The #MeToo movement came to Costa Rica last week, and it came in one of the biggest ways possible. This movement and our coverage is bigger than one story. In keeping with our principles of independent reporting, our small and dedicated team of journalists is gearing up to explore these issues even further.We want to collect and share the best practices from around the world for reporting on gender issues, sexual violence and harassment. We want to find out what Costa Rica is doing to help when it comes to mental health and supporting everyone affected by these issues.We also want to hear from women who aren’t in the Central Valley, who don’t have the privilege many of us do. The migrants who work in hotels, the locals forced to put up with harassment for tourist dollars, those who don’t feel that speaking up is an option.But our reporting is funded by readers like you and we can only grow with your help. Our goal is to reach 1,000 new subscribers this month. Click here for more about how to donate.Become a member of The Tico Times 5% Club with a monthly donation and support our journalists at a critical moment in Costa Rican history. Because now, more than ever, quality, ethical, in-depth local journalism matters.Support the Tico Times Facebook Commentslast_img read more