13,000-Home Kayenta Solar Project Comes Online as Closure Looms for Navajo Coal Power Plant

first_img13,000-Home Kayenta Solar Project Comes Online as Closure Looms for Navajo Coal Power Plant FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Associated Press:A giant array of solar panels near the famed sandstone buttes of Monument Valley has begun producing electricity for the Navajo Nation at a time when the tribe is bracing for the loss of hundreds of jobs from the impending closure of a nearby coal-fired power plant.The Kayenta Solar Facility is the first utility-scale solar project on the Navajo Nation, producing enough electricity to power about 13,000 Navajo homes.The plant comes at a time when the area’s energy landscape is shifting.The coal-fired Navajo Generating Station near Page is set to close in December 2019, leaving a site that both tribal and private entities say has potential for renewable energy development.The Navajo Tribal Utility Authority, which owns the solar plant, said the project advances clean energy on the reservation long known for fossil fuel development, the Arizona Daily Sun reported (http://bit.ly/2wj3fsc ).Walter Haase, general manager of the tribal utility, said the plant proves to investors, developers and tribal communities that renewable energy projects are possible on the reservation. Economic development often is hampered by the lack of infrastructure, required environmental clearances and consent from anyone holding a permit or lease for use of the land.Before the solar facility, “we had a reputation in the industry of not being able to get something built or brought online,” Haase said.The town of Kayenta benefited, too. The contractor hired and trained about 200 Navajos to build the plant, said Deenise Becenti, a spokeswoman for the tribal utility, leaving a qualified workforce for other projects.The tribal utility avoided passing on the $60 million cost of the solar plant to its customers through federal solar investor tax credits, said Glenn Steiger, project manager for the solar farm. A two-year power purchase and renewable energy credit agreement with the Salt River Project will cover loan repayments for the plant’s construction, Steiger said.The tribal utility is working on extending the agreement.Navajo solar plant breaks new groundlast_img read more

Update on the latest sports

first_imgIn a statement Monday, marathon organizers and city officials cited the challenge of staging the large-scale Oct. 11 event while COVID-19 concerns endure. As of Sunday, Chicago’s health department reported 55,184 confirmed cases of the virus and 2,682 deaths due to complications from COVID-19. Chicago’s event typically draws about 45,000 runners and wheelchair athletes, and more than one million spectators. Mayor Lori Lightfoot says she is personally disappointed at the cancellation. The Boston Marathon and New York Marathon have also been canceled because of the pandemic. July 13, 2020 BRAVES-NAME Braves say they won’t change name but studying chop chantATLANTA (AP) — The Atlanta Braves say they have no plans to follow the lead of the NFL’s Washington Redskins and change their team name. The tomahawk chop chant used by Braves fans is under review, however. The team said in the letter it is seeking input from the Native American community, fans, players and former players as it examines the fan experience, including the chant. The Redskins announced Monday they will change their name and Indian head logo.The Braves say they have established a “cultural working relationship” with the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians in North Carolina and formed a Native American Working Group. As recently as Sunday, the Rockets believed that Westbrook and James Harden — neither of whom traveled with the team to Walt Disney World near Orlando last week — would be with the team in the next few days. In Westbrook’s case, that now seems most unlikely.LAKERS-RONDO INJUREDLakers G Rajon Rondo breaks thumb in practice, out 6-8 weeksLOS ANGELES (AP) — Rajon Rondo has broken his right thumb in practice with the Los Angeles Lakers in Orlando. The veteran point guard will be out for six to eight weeks. The name came with the team on its move from Milwaukee to Atlanta in 1966. The name was adopted in 1912, when the team was based in Boston.VIRUS OUTBREAK-NBAWestbrook tests positiveLAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. (AP) — Russell Westbrook of the Houston Rockets says he has tested positive for coronavirus, and that he plans to eventually join his team at the restart of the NBA season. Westbrook made the revelation Monday on social media. Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditREDSKINS-NICKNAMEWashington NFL team dropping ‘Redskins’ name after 87 yearsWASHINGTON (AP) — The Washington NFL team is shedding the “Redskins” name effective immediately. The face shield was designed by Oakley, which already provides visors for the players. The union’s medical director had suggested that players wear face masks to help control the spread of the virus, but players shot down that idea. The face shield has received a better response than the mask suggestion.VIRUS OUTBREAK-CHICAGO MARATHONChicago marathon canceledCHICAGO (AP) — The Bank of America Chicago Marathon has been cancelled due to the coronavirus pandemic. Braves say they won’t change name but studying chop chantATLANTA (AP) — The Atlanta Braves say they have no plans to follow the lead of the NFL’s Washington Redskins and change their team name. The tomahawk chop chant used by Braves fans is under review, however. The team said in the letter it is seeking input from the Native American community, fans, players and former players as it examines the fan experience, including the chant. The Redskins announced Monday they will change their name and Indian head logo.The Braves say they have established a “cultural working relationship” with the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians in North Carolina and formed a Native American Working Group. The name came with the team on its move from Milwaukee to Atlanta in 1966. The name was adopted in 1912, when the team was based in Boston. Update on the latest sports Hicks had been taking part in workouts at Busch Stadium, leading up to the Cardinals’ opener on July 24 at home against Pittsburgh.VIRUS OUTBREAK-NHLNHL says 43 tested positiveUNDATED (AP) — The NHL says 43 players tested positive for the coronavirus from June 8 through the end of the league’s optional workouts.That number announced Monday includes 30 who tested positive at team facilities and 13 the league is aware of who tested positive outside the league’s protocols for its Phase 2. Rondo has been a key backup during his second season with the Lakers, who signed him shortly after adding LeBron James to the roster in July 2018. Rondo is averaging 7.1 points, 5.0 assists and 3.0 rebounds in 48 appearances this season, including three starts. He has been a regular presence on the floor late in close games, with coach Frank Vogel trusting his veteran leadership and playmaking. MLB-CARDINALS-HICKSHicks opts out of 2020 seasonST. LOUIS (AP) — Hard-throwing St. Louis Cardinals reliever Jordan Hicks has opted out of playing this season, citing pre-existing health concerns. The 23-year-old Hicks was diagnosed in high school as having Type 1 diabetes. Hicks, who routinely throws over 100 mph, is recovering from Tommy John surgery on June 26, 2019. The right-hander’s availability for this season was uncertain. Associated Press The Ivy League announced a similar decision last week. Meanwhile, Southeastern Conference athletic directors met to discuss how the SEC can have a football season as COVID-19 cases spike throughout much of the South.VIRUS OUTBREAK-NFL-FACE SHIELDSNFL comes up with face shields for helmetsUNDATED (AP) — With NFL training camps set to start at the end of the month, the league believes it is one step closer to addressing player safety amid the coronavirus pandemic. It has come up with face shields for the players’ helmets. The change comes less than two weeks after owner Dan Snyder launched an organizational review amid pressure from sponsors to make a change. FedEx, Nike, Pepsi and Bank of America all lined up against the name, which was given to the franchise in 1933 when the team was still based in Boston.A new name for one of football’s oldest franchises must still be selected and it’s unclear how soon that will happen. Native American experts and advocates have long protested the name they call a “dictionary-defined racial slur.” More than a dozen Native leaders and organizations wrote to NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell last week demanding an immediate end to Washington’s use of the name.Goodell, who has fielded questions on the topic for years, said he supported the review. BRAVES-NICKNBAMES The NHL opened Phase 3 Monday with the start of training camps for the 24-team playoffs, scheduled to open in two hub Canadian cities — Toronto and Edmonton, Alberta — on Aug. 1. Players had until Monday evening to elect to opt out of competition without penalty.All players who tested positive self-isolated. The NHL is not sharing names of the players who test positive or the teams involved.VIRUS OUTBREAK-COLLEGE SPORTSPatriot League calls off fall sportsUNDATED (AP) — The Patriot League has joined the Ivy League and called off fall sports because of the pandemic. The league’s 10 Division I schools will not compete this fall in football, soccer and women’s volleyball. last_img read more

Poll shows Proposition 23 losing support in California

first_imgA recent Field Poll has shown that California’s Proposition 23 is losing support in the polls.Proposition 23 would suspend the implementation of the Global Warming Solutions Act — AB 32 — until California unemployment is down to 5.5 percent.The latest polls show 45 percent of voters oppose the proposition, with only 34 supporting it.The proposition was introduced by Texas oil giants Valero and Tesoro, along with a refinery owned by billionaires Charles and David Koch. It would suspend the state law that requires greenhouse gas emissions be reduced to levels they were at in 1990 by the year 2020.The proposition has found little support in California. Democrats are overwhelmingly against it and Republicans seem divided on the issue.Though Republican Carly Fiorina has voiced her support for Proposition 23, Republican gubernatorial candidate Meg Whitman has said she opposes it, preferring a one-year moratorium instead of completely doing away with the clean energy bill.“Climate change is going to get worse fast,” said Mark Bernstein, managing director of the USC Energy Institute. “[Students] are young enough to see that. If Prop 23 passes, in the near-term, there’ll be less opportunities for doing things that are green.”Bernstein added that green technology is the only job industry currently expanding in the state.“Where are the jobs going to be when you guys graduate? The only sector that is growing is green technologies,” Bernstein said. “That’s where the jobs are. And it’s only there because the government is putting it in place.”Campus activist groups also oppose the proposition and protested at Valero gas stations across the state.“Clean energy is our future,” said Ryan Waters, campaign coordinator of the No On Prop 23 CALPIRG chapter at USC. “We need to do everything we can to make sure California is a leader in clean energy and clean technology.”Proponents of Proposition 23 say it will cost money to implement AB 32, which is set to start in 2012.According to arguments made in favor of the proposition in the California Voter Guide, “AB 32 will cause California households to face higher prices both directly for electricity, natural gas and gasoline, and indirectly as businesses pass costs for [greenhouse gas] reduction on to consumers.”But Bernstein said the long-term costs are nothing compared to the ultimate benefits of AB 32.“Will it cost us? In the long-term, maybe,” Bernstein said. “But by the time we get out there, technology will improve and it probably won’t cost us anything. The benefits in the near-term significantly outweigh the costs.”Micah Scheindlin, political director of USC College Democrats, agreed.“Their arguments regarding revenue are wholly wrong,” Scheindlin said. “If anything, passing Proposition 23 would stunt the growth of California’s green tech economy and therefore cost the state revenue.”The proposition’s opponents include The League of Women’s Voters and liberal college groups including California College Democrats.Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger also opposes the proposition, having originally signed AB 32 into legislation in 2006.“The effort to suspend AB 32 is the work of greedy oil companies who want to keep polluting in our state and making profits,” Schwarzenegger said after the measure qualified for the November ballot.Two advocacy groups, the Courage Campaign and CREDO Action, have called for a boycott of Valero and Beacon gas stations in order to punish Valero for providing financial sponsorship of the initiative.In the end, Bernstein said, students’ futures are in their hands.“[AB 32] is not overcoming the jobless rate yet, but it’s getting there,” Bernstein said. “I really want the students to get out and vote.”last_img read more