Leftist law professor says gay marriage likely to lead to legalized incest, polygamy

first_imgThe Daily Caller 19 July 2013In the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court’s two recent rulings validating gay  marriage, a Boston College Law School professor has come out and admitted what  gay marriage adversaries have long argued: incest and polygamy are just around  the bend.“You know those opponents of marriage equality who said government approval  of same-sex marriage might erode bans on polygamous and incestuous marriages?”  asks the professor, Kent Greenfield. “They’re  right.”In a piece at the website of The American Prospect, the Catholic law  school prof then goes on to challenge gay marriage supporters to differentiate  totally acceptable gay and lesbian marriages from various forms of communal  marriage and sibling love.“The left is in this bind in part because our arguments for expanding the  marriage right to same-sex couples have been so compelling,” Greenfield brags  proudly. “Marriage, we’ve said, is about defining one’s own family and  consecrating a union based on love. We’ve voiced these arguments in  constitutional terms, using claims arising from the doctrines of ‘fundamental  rights’ and equal protection.”http://dailycaller.com/2013/07/19/leftist-law-professor-admits-gay-marriage-likely-to-lead-to-legalized-incest-polygamy/last_img read more

Reflections of Fidel: NATO’s genocidal role (Part III)

first_img 11 Views   no discussions Share Sharing is caring! Share Fidel Castro. Image via: globalresearch.ca“ON February 23, under the title “Cynicism’s,” danse macabre, I stated:“The politics of plunder imposed by the United States and its NATO allies in the Middle East is in crisis.”“Thanks to Sadat’s betrayal at Camp David, the Palestinian Arab State has not come into existence, despite the United Nations agreements of November 1947, and Israel has become a powerful nuclear force allied with the United States and NATO.“The U.S. military-industrial complex supplies tens of billions of dollars every year to Israel and to the very Arab states that it subjugates and humiliates.“The genie is out of the bottle and NATO doesn’t know how to control it.“They are going to try and take maximum advantage of the lamentable events in Libya. No one is capable of knowing at this time what is happening there. All of the figures and versions, even the most improbable, have been disseminated by the empire through the mass media, sowing chaos and misinformation.“It is evident that a civil war is developing in Libya. Why and how was this unleashed? Who will suffer the consequences? The Reuters news agency, repeating the opinion of the well-known Nomura Japanese bank, said that the price of oil could surpass all limits.”“…What will be the consequences for the food crisis?“The principal NATO leaders are exalted. British Prime MinisterDavid Cameron, informed ANSA, ‘…admitted in a speech in Kuwait that the Western countries made a mistake in supporting non-democratic governments in the Arab world.’”“His French colleague Nicolas Sarkozy declared, ‘The prolonged brutal and bloody repression of the Libyan civilian population is repugnant.’”“Italian Foreign Minister Franco Frattini declared ‘believable’ the figure of one thousand dead in Tripoli […] ‘the tragic figure will be a bloodbath.’”“Hillary Clinton declared, ‘…the bloodbath is completely unacceptable and has to stop…’”“Ban Ki-moon added, ‘The use of violence in the country is absolutely unacceptable.’”“…’the Security Council will act in accordance with what the international community decides.’”“’We are considering a number of options.’”“What Ban Ki-moon is really waiting for is that Obama give the final word.“The President of the United States spoke Wednesday afternoon and stated that the Secretary of State would leave for Europe in order to reach an agreement with the NATO European allies as to what measures to take. Noticeable on his face was his readiness to take on the right-wing Republican John McCain; Joseph Lieberman, the pro-Israel Senator from Connecticut; and Tea Party leaders, in order to guarantee his nomination by the Democratic Party.“The empire’s mass media have prepared the ground for action. There would be nothing strange about a military intervention in Libya, which would, additionally, guarantee Europe almost two million barrels of light oil a day, if events do not occur beforehand to put an end to the presidency or life of Gaddafi.“In any event, Obama’s role is complicated enough. What would the Arab and Islamic world’s reaction be if much blood is spilt in this country in such an adventure? Would the revolutionary wave unleashed in Egypt stop a NATO intervention?“In Iraq the innocent blood of more than a million Arab citizens was shed when this country was invaded on false pretenses. Mission accomplished, George W. Bush proclaimed.“No one in the world will ever be in favor of the deaths of defenseless civilians in Libya or anywhere else. I ask myself, would the United States and NATO apply that principle to the defenseless civilians killed every day by yankee drones and this organization’s soldiers in Afghanistan and Pakistan?“It is a danse macabre of cynicism.”While I was meditating on these events, the United Nations debate scheduled for yesterday, Tuesday, October 25 on the “Necessity of ending the commercial and financial blockade imposed by the United States on Cuba began. This is something which has been demanded by the vast majority of this institution’s member countries for 20 years.This time the numerous elemental and just arguments – which for United States governments were no more than rhetorical exercises – revealed, like never before, the political and moral weakness of the most powerful empire ever to have existed, and to whose oligarchical interests and insatiable thirst for power and riches all the planet’s inhabitants have been subjected, including the very people of that country.The United States is tyrannizing and plundering the globalized world with its political, economic, technological and military might.That truth is becoming more and more obvious in the wake of the honest and courageous debates which have taken place in the United Nations during the last 20 years, with the support of states which one would imagine are expressing the will of the vast majority of the planet’s inhabitants.Before [Cuban Foreign Minister] Bruno’s speech, many country organizations expressed their points of view through one of their members. The first was Argentina, in the name of the Group of 77 plus China; followed by Egypt, in the name of the Non-Aligned Movement; Kenya, in the name of the African Union; Belize, in the name of CARICOM; Kazakhstan, in the name of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation; and Uruguay, in the name of MERCOSUR.Independently of these expressions of a collective nature, China, a country of growing political and economic weight in the world, India and Indonesia strongly supported the resolution via their ambassadors; between the three of them they represent 2.7 billion inhabitants. The ambassadors of the Russian Federation, Belarus, South Africa, Algeria, Venezuela and Mexico did likewise. The impassioned words of solidarity expressed by the ambassador of Belize, speaking on behalf of the Caribbean community, and those of St. Vincent & the Grenadines and Bolivia, resonated among the poorest countries of the Caribbean and Latin America. Their arguments in the context of the solidarity of our people – despite a blockade which has already lasted 50 years – will be a constant stimulus for our doctors, educators and scientists.Nicaragua spoke before the vote, to bravely explain why it would vote against this perfidious measure.The United States representative also spoke before the vote, in order to explain the inexplicable. I felt sorry for him. It is the role that they assigned to him.At the hour of voting, two countries were absent: Libya and Sweden; three abstained: Marshall Islands, Micronesia and Palau; two voted against: the United States and Israel. Adding together those who voted against, abstained or were absent: the United States, with 313 million inhabitants; Israel, with 7.4 million; Sweden, with 9.1 million; Libya, with 6.5 million; Marshall Islands, with 67,100; Micronesia, 106,800; Palau, with 20,900, the total amounts to 336.948 million, equivalent to 4.8% of the world population, which has already risen to seven billion this month.After the vote, speaking in the name of the European Union, Poland explained the votes of members of this bloc which, in spite of its close alliance with the United States and its obligatory participation in the blockade, is against this criminal measure.Subsequently, 17 countries addressed the Assembly to explain, resolutely and decisively, why they voted for the resolution against the blockade.I will continue Friday the 28th.Fidel Castro RuzOctober 26, 2011. 9:45 p.m.center_img Tweet Share NewsRegional Reflections of Fidel: NATO’s genocidal role (Part III) by: – October 27, 2011last_img read more

USC playwright honored for his written works

first_imgBrian Polak, a third-year graduate student pursuing a Master of Fine Arts degree in dramatic writing, is well on his way to becoming one of the United States’ most acclaimed young playwrights.Write stuff · Third-year graduate student Brian Polak will travel to the 2014 Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival to see two of his plays performed. – Photo courtesy of Brian Polak Polak  was recently recognized for his written plays by the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. The aspiring writer entered two of his works — a full-length play and a short play — in the 2014 Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival. The festival, which will take place April 14-19 in D.C., is a national program involving 18,000 students from more than 600 academic institutions.Polak’s full-length play, Henry and the Hippocampus, has already been awarded the festival’s Jean Kennedy Smith Playwriting Award for an outstanding                student-written script exploring the experience of living with disability.The play, originally inspired by a National Public Radio story about a man who spent the last 50 years of his life unable to create new memories, tells the story of a man named Henry who has a similar affliction. The story follows the journey that Henry, his wife and his doctor take to try and rebuild his ability to form memories.Polak said that writing the play was challenging due to Henry’s neurological state.“When we watch plays or movies, we like to watch a character kind of go on a journey, change and become a different person,” Polak said. “But here we have this character who medically cannot do that.”When Polak attends the festival in April, in addition to accepting his award, he will have the opportunity to see an excerpt of Henry and the Hippocampus performed.Polak’s short play War Profits will also be performed at the festival. War Profits was loosely inspired by Bertolt Brecht’s Mother Courage and Her Children, and follows two U.S. soldiers in Iraq in 2007 who become disillusioned with the war they agreed to fight and decide to go AWOL.“One of the themes that I’m exploring in several of my plays right now is my relationship to my country,” Polak said. “War isn’t what we see in the news every day. It’s much more complicated … so I decided to create these characters who, once the dirtiness and the scariness and the messiness was revealed to them, they were like, ‘I don’t like this, I can’t do this anymore.’”Polak’s success as a playwright stemmed from his foray into theater shortly after receiving his B.A. in philosophy from Marymount University. When he was working full-time, Polak started to get involved in acting classes, improvisational comedy and traditional theater on the side.“I’m not actually very good at acting,” Polak said. “It became my creative outlet, but I never felt comfortable doing it because it never felt right; something felt amiss.”Once he realized this, Polak started searching for alternative creative outlets and he soon found himself writing.“I didn’t really know what I was doing,” he said. “I just knew that I was doing plays as an actor, so why not try to write them?”While still in the early stages of pursuing a writing career, Polak met his future wife who encouraged him to take writing more seriously.“[My wife] was a writer, and all her friends were writers, and they were like serious, dedicated writers,” Polak said. “I learned [from her] what it really meant to be a writer … It’s a serious art form.”Several years later, after Polak had spent time developing his craft, he and his wife moved to Los Angeles. Shortly after the move, Polak wanted to study playwriting in a formal academic setting.“I never had anything I wanted to study before,” he said. “It took me many years to realize that there is this thing that I care about and I love, and it’s playwriting.”During his time at USC, Polak has been free of the many distractions that would otherwise take him away from what he loves best: writing.“[Being at USC] has helped me focus my attention on my writing in a way that I wouldn’t be able to do as the writer I was before I came to grad school, where I was writing in the morning and then going to work,” Polak said.In addition to the time he has to work on his own writing, Polak says he also has time to engage with professors and other students who can offer him feedback and additional readings to fuel his growth as a writer.“Writing gives me this closeness to the world,” Polak said. “My hope is that when I graduate I’ll be able to start living a life in the theater and presenting these plays publicly for an audience, with the hope that the audience will feel that same closeness to the world that I’m feeling writing.”USC audiences can hear a reading of Henry and the Hippocampus presented at McClintock Theatre as part of the School of Dramatic Arts New Works Festival on May 28-31.last_img read more